true or false: with a discount bond, the return on a bond is equal to the rate of capital gain. - Writing Clip Art

true or false: with a discount bond, the return on a bond is equal to the rate of capital gain.

I love the truth, but it is more complicated than a simple yes or no. If you’ve ever had a bond fall in value due to an investment or sale, you know how it feels to get a bond that suddenly and suddenly costs less than it was expected to. You begin to wonder why you thought that bond was worth $100, when it was actually only worth $99.

This is why I love bonds. The return on a bond is equal to the rate of capital gain. If you think about it, the return on a bond can be used to calculate the rate of capital gain. After all, if you buy a bond of 100, and then sell it for 200, you can say that the return on the bond is 100.

I think the way you approach this is by assuming that you have an investment that you are selling. You have a bond with a discount of 100. You want to sell that bond. You want to sell the bond for 200. If you sold it for 99, you would have to pay 50 now. So the rate of capital gain for that bond is also 99. But, you said that the return on the bond is equal to the rate of capital gain.

That’s true, but when you factor in the costs of selling the bond, you have to pay the money back. That’s when the bond is considered to be a loan, and not a gain. Because you didn’t have the money to pay back the loan, you had to sell a bond.

This is an interesting quote from Andrew Dickson, the CEO of the US Government’s Office of Investment Managers. The Government’s Investment Management Division has been a major player in the bond market. The Division is responsible for managing the Federal Government’s investment portfolio. In the 1990’s, the Division did a special study that gave itself a set of numbers that was useful in the bond market.

What they found was that the return on bonds in this study was equal to the rate of capital gains (or the annual return on the average bond, whichever was lower). So a bond with a 10% return would have had 5% on it by the time the study was finished and the bond was in the market.

this is the stuff of legends. I’ve never heard of a bond with a 10 return. But then the bond market is notoriously bad at predicting the future. When bonds are due, investors simply go ahead and buy them at the low rates that they are expected to pay. For example, if you bought a 10 year bond with a 2% return, you would have paid $3.40 for the bond (that’s the annual return). You would have paid more (6.

Yes, the bond market is terrible at predicting the future. A bond’s return on that 2 return is equal to the rate of capital gain. A bond does not pay a 10 return, the return is simply the rate of the capital gain. The fact is, a bond is issued by the issuer and is sold by the investor. The return on the bond is the interest, and the return on the bond is the yield.

The fact is, a bond is issued by the issuer and is sold by the investor. The interest is the interest. The yield is simply the nominal yield. Yes, the bond market is terrible at predicting the future. A bond does not pay a 10 return, the return is simply the rate of the capital gain. The fact is, a bond is issued by the issuer and is sold by the investor.

As it turns out, the return on a bond is the rate of capital gain. Yes, the bond market is terrible at predicting the future. A bond does not pay a 10 return, the return is simply the rate of the capital gain. As it turns out, the return on a bond is the rate of capital gain. Sure, a bond does not pay a 10 return, but that’s not the point. The point is that a bond should pay a 10 return.

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